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Tech Thursday

Tech Thursday

Tech Thurday #005: Arduino to Arduino Serial Communication

Serial communication is a major backbone in embedded electronics and it is exceptionally common to have two embedded devices to talk to one another. For example, you may have one Arduino reading joysticks and sensors and another wired into a robot to command motors, servos, relays, etc. Today’s Tech Thursday will walk you through basic Arduino to Arduino serial communication. Schematic Below...

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Tech Thursday

Tech Thursday #004: 3D Print Molding

Do you have a 3D printer? Try this to make higher quality parts with different materials that probably can’t print with your 3D printer. 3D printers are great for prototyping but when it comes to make a part that needs to be durable they usually struggle. You can, however, use them to print a mold of a part and then use a two-part urethane, epoxy, or any other curable liquid material to cast...

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Tech Thursday

Tech Thursday #003: Remote Control Turkey for Thanksgiving

We are a little early with this posting, but wanted to get it out before the holiday. So for our third installment of Technical Thursday, we figured we would honor Thanksgiving by provide a cool project idea of making a remote control turkey. If you hunter, this makes a great remote control decoy. Click on the image below to watch a quick movie. So the idea is relatively simple. Take a MLT-JR RC c...

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Tech Thursday

Tech Thursday #002: Basic Motor Control with a Switch

There are many motor applications where a full motor controller just isn’t needed. Sometimes all you need to do is to move a motor one direction and then the other without controlling speed. We’ve compiled a short list of a couple basic options for your project. Motor Control using a DPDT Switch In this application you can control the direction of a motor using a simple DPDT (double-po...

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Tech Thursday

Tech Thursday #001: How to Make a Motor Act Like a Linear Actuator

Very often when designing some sort of mechanical assembly you want your widget to move a part across a specific area. But moving too far, it could damage itself. This is why linear actuators are popular. You can apply a voltage to it and it will extend all the way out but not far enough to damage itself. Inside of every linear actuator is a gear motor, a threaded rod, and a pair of limit switches...

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